About your stay at Lee Abbey …

Covid

Please be aware that you will be asked to comply with any Covid related restrictions that may be in place during your stay.  We ask that you take a lateral flow test before coming to Lee Abbey and only start your journey if you test negative. If you are displaying symptoms of Covid, again we ask that you do not come. We recommend taking out travel/holiday insurance to cover for this and all other risks.

Covid-secure protocols

New guidance from Devon County Council sets out how to live safely with COVID-19

How to live safely with COVID-19

As April started, so did a new phase of living with COVID-19, where the virus will be managed like other respiratory illnesses.

But the pandemic is not over, and how COVID-19 will develop over time remains uncertain, so we all still have a part to play in helping keep ourselves and each other safe and protected.

The government has published important advice for people with symptoms of respiratory infections, such as COVID-19; people with a positive COVID-19 test result and their contacts; and advice on safer behaviours for everyone.

It sounds like a lot to take in, so we’ve summarised it in this special edition of our newsletter.

Symptoms of respiratory infections, including COVID-19

Respiratory infections can spread easily between people, so it’s important to be aware of the symptoms so you can take action to reduce the risk of spreading your infection to others.

Symptoms of COVID-19, flu and common respiratory infections include:

·         continuous cough

·         high temperature, fever or chills

·         loss of, or change in, your normal sense of taste or smell

·         shortness of breath

·         unexplained tiredness, lack of energy

·         muscle aches or pains that are not due to exercise

·         not wanting to eat or not feeling hungry

·         headache that is unusual or longer lasting than usual

·         sore throat, stuffy or runny nose

·         diarrhoea, feeling sick or being sick

People who are at higher risk from COVID-19 and other respiratory infections include:

·         older people

·         those who are pregnant

·         those who are unvaccinated

·         people of any age whose immune system means they are at higher risk of serious illness

·         people of any age with certain long-term conditions

Please remember that you will not always know whether someone you come into contact with outside your home is at higher risk of becoming seriously unwell from a respiratory infection. They could be strangers (for example, people you sit next to on public transport) or people you may have regular contact with (for example, friends and work colleagues).

This means it is important to follow the guidance to reduce the spread of infection and help to keep others safe.

How do I reduce the risks of spreading respiratory infections?

As we learn to live safely with COVID-19, there are actions we can all take to help reduce the risk of catching the virus and passing it on to others. These actions will also help to reduce the spread of other respiratory infections, such as flu, which can spread easily and may cause serious illness in some people.

💉 Getting vaccinated – vaccines are the best defence we have against respiratory infections such as COVID-19 and flu. They provide good protection against hospitalisation and death as well as reducing the risk of long-term symptoms.

💨 Let fresh air in if meeting others indoors – the amount of respiratory virus in the air can build up in poorly ventilated areas, which increases the risk of spreading it. Bringing fresh air into a room by opening a door or a window, even for a few minutes at a time, helps remove older stale air that could contain virus particles and reduces the chance of spreading infections.

🧼 Remember the basics of good hygiene – cover your nose and mouth with a tissue or the crook of your elbow when you cough and sneeze to reduce the distance your particles travel and the time they stay in the air;  wash your hands properly and regularly so you remove viruses and other germs you may have picked up from contaminated surfaces; clean your surroundings frequently, particularly those touched at lot such as handles.

😷 Wear a face covering – this can reduce the number of particles that are released from the mouth and nose of someone who is infected with a respiratory virus and also protect the person wearing the face covering from becoming infected by some viruses. It’s a good idea to wear one when there are a lot of respiratory viruses circulating, such as in winter, and especially if you are in crowded enclosed spaces or are in contact with someone at higher risk of becoming seriously unwell from respiratory infections.

🤒 Try to stay at home and avoid contact with other people when unwell – if you have symptoms of a respiratory infection and you have a high temperature or do not feel well enough to go to work or carry out normal activities, try to stay at home and avoid contact with other people, until you no longer have a high temperature or until you no longer feel unwell.

What should I do if I have symptoms of a respiratory infection?

People with symptoms of a respiratory infection, such as COVID-19, and who have a high temperature or do not feel well, should try to stay at home and avoid contact with others.

Anyone who needs to leave their home whilst they have symptoms of a respiratory infection should take important precautions to minimise the chance of passing on their infection, such as:

·         wearing a well-fitting face covering or a face mask

·         avoiding crowded or enclosed spaces such as public transport, large social gatherings and enclosed or poorly ventilated spaces

·         exercising outdoors and away from others

·         covering your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze; washing your hands properly and frequently with soap and water for 20 seconds or use hand sanitiser after coughing, sneezing and blowing your nose and before you eat or handle food; avoid touching your face.

What should I do if my child has symptoms of a respiratory infection?

Respiratory infections are common in children and young people, particularly during the winter months. Symptoms can be caused by several respiratory infections including the common cold, COVID-19 and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and for most children and young people, these illnesses will not be serious, and they will soon recover following rest and plenty of fluids.

Attending education is hugely important for children and young people’s health and their future. Children and young people with mild symptoms such as a runny nose, sore throat, or slight cough, who are otherwise well, can continue to attend their education setting.

Children and young people who are unwell and have a high temperature should stay at home and avoid contact with other people, where they can. They can go back to school, college or childcare, and resume normal activities when they no longer have a high temperature and they are well enough to attend.

All children and young people with respiratory symptoms should be encouraged to cover their mouth and nose with a disposable tissue when coughing and/or sneezing and to wash their hands after using or disposing of tissues.

It can be difficult to know when to seek help if your child is unwell. If you are worried about your child, especially if they are aged under 2 years old, then you should seek medical help via your GP or NHS 111. In an emergency call 999.

What to do if you have a positive COVID-19 test result

Those who are asked to, or choose to, take a COVID-19 test, and get a positive result should try to stay at home and avoid contact with other people for five days after the day of the test. If you leave your home during this time, following steps above will reduce the chance of passing on COVID-19 to others.

You should also advise anyone that needs to come into your home that you have a positive COVID-19 test result, so they can take precautions to protect themselves such as wearing a well-fitting face covering and keeping their distance if they can.

It is particularly important to avoid contact with anyone who is at higher risk of becoming severely unwell if they are infected with COVID-19, especially those whose immune system means they are at higher risk of serious illness from COVID-19, despite vaccination, for a 10-day period.

It is no longer a requirement for children and young people to test for COVID-19 unless directed to by a health professional. Children and young people tend to be infectious to other people for less time than adults, so if they have a positive COVID-19 test result they should try to stay at home and avoid contact with other people for 3 days after the day they took the test, if they can. After 3 days, if they feel well and do not have a high temperature, the risk of passing the infection on to others is much lower.

While you are infectious there is a high risk of passing your infection to others in your household, so try to limit your close contact with the people you live with, keep your distance and wear a face covering in communal areas, ventilate rooms and regularly clean frequently touched surfaces.

What to do if you are a close contact of someone who has had a positive COVID-19 test result

People who live in the same household as someone with COVID-19, or who stayed overnight, are at the highest risk of becoming infected because they are most likely to have prolonged close contact.

If you are a household or overnight contact of someone who has had a positive COVID -19 test result it can take up to 10 days for your infection to develop, and it is possible to pass on COVID-19 to others, even if you have no symptoms.

During this time you can reduce the risk to others by limiting your close contact with them, wearing a face covering and washing your hand properly and frequently. It is also important to avoid contact with anyone you know who is at higher risk of becoming severely unwell if they are infected with COVID-19, especially those whose immune system means they are at higher risk of serious illness from COVID-19, despite vaccination.

If you develop symptoms of a respiratory infection try to stay at home and avoid contact with other people and follow the guidance for people with symptoms of a respiratory infection.

Children and young people who usually go to school, college or childcare and who live with someone who has a positive COVID-19 test result should continue to attend as normal.

Arrival

Please arrive from 4.00 pm, in time for afternoon refreshments between 4.00 – 6.00pm and dinner at 6.30 pm. If you make good time and are going to arrive before 4.00 pm you may wish to explore nearby Lynton and Lynmouth until we are ready to welcome you. We are sorry but accessing the house early will not be possible as we will be preparing for your arrival.

Departure

Departure is after breakfast by 10.00am please, unless departing after a Weekend Conference beginning on Friday and ending on Sunday when departure time is 2.00pm.

Meals

The menu will be much simpler than it previously was. Due to a smaller Community it has been necessary to simplify our catering. Provision will be made for limited special diets. Please let us know about any dietary requirements when booking so that we can plan accordingly. Meals will be served in a way that complies with Covid safety.

Programme

The daily programme will be simplified compared to the pre-closure programme. You will be invited to join the Community for Morning Prayers, either one or two morning Speaker led session(s) and Night Prayer.

Tea/Coffee

In keeping with tradition, tea and coffee will not be in short supply. Refreshments will be served at around 11.30 am and 4.00 pm daily. Vending rooms are available on each floor.

Pastoral support

Pastoral support will be available during your stay. There will be more details regarding pastoral meetings when you arrive.

A typical day

  • Morning Worship  – 8.00 – 8.30 am
  • Breakfast – 8.15 – 9.00 am
  • Speaker Led Session (Optional)– 10.00 – 11.15 am
  • Morning Coffee – 11.30am
  • Lunch – 1.00 pm
  • Afternoon Tea – 4.00 -4.30pm
  • Dinner – 6.30 pm
  • Evening Activity (Optional) – 8.00pm
  • Hot Chocolate – 9.00pm
  • Night Prayer – 9.30 pm

Seen enough?   Book now

Directions by car Public transport
Devon London Small Missional Communities Friends

Lee Abbey Fellowship is a registered company in England and Wales, number 4428897, registered address Lynton, North Devon EX35 6JJ and a registered charity in England and Wales, number 1094097, registered address Lynton, North Devon EX35 6JJ.
 
We are committed to safeguarding the welfare of children & adults and expect all who join Community to share this commitment.
 
Website copyright © Lee Abbey Devon; designed and built by Tim Wakeling. Hosted on a UK server.
Terms of use   Cookies and privacy policy